Raja Ampat

RAJA AMPAT   |   NOVEMBER TO MARCH


Raja Ampat is located off the northwest tip of the Bird’s Head Peninsular on the island of New Guinea in Indonesia’s West Papua province. The archipelago comprises over 1,500 small islands, cays and shoals surrounding the four main islands of Misool, Salawati, Batanta and Waigeo.

Incredibly remote and almost undisturbed by humans, the islands are best known for their amazing diversity of marine life with perhaps the richest coral reef ecosystems in the world - a dream for snorkelling or scuba diving.  

Whether kayaking through small canals in the mangroves, relaxing on the white sandy beaches, admiring the dramatic views, swimming with acrobatic manta rays and turtles or waterskiing with dolphins, you cannot help but be awed by nature.

SAMPLE ITINERARY : RAJA AMPAT NORTH 

SAMPLE ITINERARY : RAJA AMPAT SOUTH → Coming Soon


WAYAG, WEST WAIGEO

Climb the karst pinnacles of Wayag to survey the greens and turquoises of the limestone outcrops from above, pausing to admire the hanging orchids and pitcher plants.  

MISOOL

Peppered with rock islands, Misool is in the south of the region and sees less tourism than other parts. Canyons and lagoons are interspersed with white sandy beaches. 

PEARL FARM

The white and silver South Sea pearls cultured at the Atlas Pacific pearl farm benefit from rich, unpolluted waters. A short visit enlightens you on the grafting process and optimum conditions during the two to four years they take to form.

RED BIRDS OF PARADISE

Just one of many endemic species in the region, the rare red birds of paradise perform a ritualistic dance in the early morning - a trek to find them starts at dawn. Explore the jungle and experience the unique flora and fauna as well as indigenous communities. 

CORAL GARDENS

Raja Ampat teams with sea-life, fed by deep sea currents rich in plankton. There are upwards of 500 coral species and 1000 coral reef fish species, in glorious multi-colour that is second to none on the planet.


There are no roads, no towns, no harbours, just hundreds of miles of virgin Earth.
— Lisa Grainger, Ultratravel (The Telegraph)